Upcoming Events

Georgetown University Press will be hosting a book launch for Fr. David Hollenbach SJ’s new book, Humanity in Crisis: Ethical and Religious Response to Refugees.  It will take place on Wednesday, January 22, at 3:30 pm, on the main campus at Georgetown.   

The major humanitarian crises of recent years are well known: the Shoah, the killing fields of Cambodia, the Rwandan genocide, the massacre in Bosnia, and the tsunami in Southeast Asia, not to mention bloody conflicts in South Sudan, Syria, and Afghanistan. Millions have been killed and many millions more have been driven from their homes; the number of refugees and internally displaced persons has reached record levels. Could these crises have been prevented? Why do they continue to happen? This book seeks to understand how humanity is in crisis, and what we can do about it. Hollenbach draws on the values that have shaped major humanitarian initiatives over the past century and a half, such as the commitments of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Oxfam, Doctors without Borders, as well as the values of diverse religious traditions, including Catholicism, to examine the scope of our responsibilities and practical solutions to these global crises. He also explores the economic and political causes of these tragedies, and uncovers key moral issues for both policy makers and for practitioners working in humanitarian agencies and faith communities.

Georgetown University Press will be hosting a book launch for Fr. David Hollenbach SJ’s new book, Humanity in Crisis: Ethical and Religious Response to Refugees.  It will take place on Wednesday, January 22, at 3:30 pm, on the main campus at Georgetown

HUMANITY IN CRISIS

Ethical and Religious Response to Refugees   

David Hollenbach, SJ

Georgetown University Press  

The major humanitarian crises of recent years are well known: the Shoah, the killing fields of Cambodia, the Rwandan genocide, the massacre in Bosnia, and the tsunami in Southeast Asia, not to mention bloody conflicts in South Sudan, Syria, and Afghanistan. Millions have been killed and many millions more have been driven from their homes; the number of refugees and internally displaced persons has reached record levels. Could these crises have been prevented? Why do they continue to happen? This book seeks to understand how humanity is in crisis, and what we can do about it. Hollenbach draws on the values that have shaped major humanitarian initiatives over the past century and a half, such as the commitments of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Oxfam, Doctors without Borders, as well as the values of diverse religious traditions, including Catholicism, to examine the scope of our responsibilities and practical solutions to these global crises. He also explores the economic and political causes of these tragedies, and uncovers key moral issues for both policy makers and for practitioners working in humanitarian agencies and faith communities.

Movie Night with Fr. Matt Carnes, S.J.

Thursday, November 7 in the HFSC Film Room at 7 pm

Featuring Insomnia Cookies and milk

What do Jesuits have to do with Latin American politics? Join Fr. Carnes, S.J., Director of the Center for Latin American Studies to discuss the significance of El Salvador and the life of Archbishop Oscar Romero in the lives of the Jesuits of El Salvador and beyond. A screening of the 1989 film Romero will follow.


Catholic Higher Education Amidst the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Wednesday, November 13 in ICC 241 at 6:30 pm

with Vice-Chancellor of Bethlehem University, Brother Peter Bray


Sixth Annual Jesuit Student Research Symposium

The sixth annual Jesuit Student Research Symposium will be held at the Jesuit Archives & Research Center in St. Louis, Missouri. Each year undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in Jesuit History are invited to present their work at a small, friendly conference that draws researchers from around the country. In previous years, there has been a focus on Jesuits and Race, Jesuits and the Sciences, and Jesuits and American culture.

This year the Symposium is calling for papers and presentations on Jesuits in the world. Papers could cover a wide range of topics, from the earliest Jesuit missions to the present day. Proposals should be no more than 250 words and will be accepted by the selection committee on a rolling basis. All proposals will receive a response within two weeks of submission. The final deadline is Friday, March 6, 2020.